I'm excited to present my research on Brazilian postwar photography

I'm excited to present my research on Brazilian postwar photography. My paper, "Bandeirante photographers in global context: Brazilian participation in FIAP, 1950–1965"  is included in the program of the conference In Black and White: Photography, Race, and the Modern Impulse in Brazil at Midcentury.The conference takes place at the Martin E. Segal Theater, The Graduate Center, City University of New York (365 Fifth Avenue), May 3, 2017.

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Thrilled to speak at the conference "Art, Institutions, and Internationalism: 1933–1966"

I am thrilled to present the findings of my on-going research in paper "The Misunderstood 'Universal Language' of Photography: The Fourth FIAP Biennial, 1956" at the conference Art, Institutions, and Internationalism: 1933–1966. The conference takes place at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, March 7, 2017.

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I'm presenting my latest research at the CAA 2017, New York City

I am very excited to present my latest research at the CAA 2017 in New York City. I am presenting my paper, The “Cosmopolitan Art”: The FIAP Yearbooks of Photography, 1954–60 at the session "Photography in Print" at the Gramercy A/West (2nd Floor), New York Hilton Midtown, Friday, February 17, 2017, 10:30am–12:00 noon.

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Korean contemporary art in the US - judging a competition, Part II

I had the honor to speak on behalf of the jury of the AHL 2016 Visual Art Award at the AHL Foundation's 13th Annual Benefit Gala & Awards Ceremony, New York City, October 22, 2016. The work of the jury was not easy because all submissions were of high quality. The prizes went to the artists whose work stood out the most - artists who had the most convincing voice and the most articulate vision.

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The Selfie: More and Less than a Self-Portrait, an invited talk at the New School

In the invited talk “The Selfie: More and Less than a Self-Portrait” I will argue that the selfie is neither a low-brow offspring of the noble tradition of self-portrait in art, nor a democratic and popular version of self-portraiture in general. Instead, I will emphasize the specific conditions of making and viewing selfies as part of a live stream of updates on platforms such as Instagram. 

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Why every self-portrait is not a selfie, but every selfie is a photograph

This article, commissioned by Riga Photography Biennial 2016, focuses on the role of technologies in defining and understanding the selfie. I examine the difference between the way datasets of selfies are being constructed for research and comparison, and how selfies are consumed and experienced in their natural habitat, the live flow of images on Instagram.

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Defining competitive photography

In this article, I introduce a term competitive photography and define its historical emergence in the international juried exhibitions of photography in the 1950s. I believe that this term, competitive photography. brings into focus a large segment of photographic practices, contemporary and historical alike, which so far has escaped the attention of scholars. 

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Clash of theories: New Objectivity versus Subjective Photography

In an interesting historical turn, what was meant to be non-art, became the very epitome of art (as exemplified by Albert Renger-Patzsch’s followers), whereas the most artistic photography of the 1950s (Otto Steinert’s Subjective Photography) turned out to be a dead end, at least from the perspective of today's art history.

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Making sense of the selfie

This article belongs to a series of related articles and book chapters that I have written since the late 2014 and early 2015 about photography in social media and selfies in particular. All these writings are based on research project Selfiecity that I co-authored with Lev Manovich, Moritz Stefaner, Mehrdad Yazdani, Dominikus Baur, Daniel Goddemeyer, Nadav Hochman, and Jay Chow.

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Art of the masses: From Kodak Brownie to Instagram

This article touches upon some of the inherent complexities of understanding the selfie. Seeking for valid methods of theorizing and contextualizing the selfie, this article attempts to combine insights from the perspectives of history of photography and art history, digital humanities, and software studies.

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Good photography is a game of rules

There’s two kinds of photography, one that follows the rules and one that does not. When you follow the rules, you get good photography. When you break the rules, you might either get good art or waste the resources. After years of studying photography that breaks the rules, I’m turning to photography that follows the rules.

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Gisèle Freund about women photographers

Gisèle Freund in 1954 wrote that "Women are interested in things more than in their relations to each other. They are not easily attracted by political or current events, but they distinguish themselves in portraits, children’s photographs, and they know how to capture with subtlety every expression of everyday life." From today’s perspective, it may sound outrageously “anti-feminist” and patronizing. But what if she was right?

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Work in progress: The aesthetics of Instagram photography

At the CUNY Digital Humanities event, November 20, 2015, I'm presenting work in progress, a research article co-written by Lev Manovich, where we discuss the aesthetic qualities of photography on Instagram and are attempting to answer questions such as: is "Instagram killing the art of photography" or rather "Here comes the new photographer" again?

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"The Impossibility of Capturing Butoh in Photography," a new book chapter

How to describe the relationship between butoh, a performance based on movement and emotion, and photography, a medium that freezes movement and removes all emotions? To address this question, in this article I compare of Kamaitachi (1968) by Japanese photographer Eikoh Hosoe (b. 1933), and Riga Pantomime (1964-1965) by Latvian photographer Zenta Dzividzinska (1944-2011).

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